July 26, 2016

FAQ

Cuba Tourist Visa Card

The required tourist visa, known as a tourist card, allows the holder to stay in the Cuba for 30 days and is valid for a single entry. You must provide proof of confirmed return flight and booked accommodation.

Cuba requires that all arriving travelers have a Tourist Card or Visa to enter the country. This visa is to be purchased for all non-Cuban born travelers that are traveling under one of the 12 permitted categories. There are two documents you must have to travel to Cuba, a passport and the tourist card. The traveler must fill it out with black ink and no mistakes. In case a mistake occurs the traveler needs to purchase a new visa. The Tourist Card is perforated in two sections, the immigration representative will keep one perforated portion and the second section will be turned in upon departure. *Please do not detach the two separate sides. Customs in Cuba is responsible for this.

TOURIST CARDS ARE NOT VALID FOR INDIVIDUALS BORN IN CUBA.  FOR THOSE INDIVIDUALS BORN IN CUBA THE VISA ENTRY PROCESS IS DIFFERENT AND YOU MAY CONTACT US @ info@cubavisaservices.com FOR FURTHER INFORMATION ON THE PROCESS.

Citizens of several countries may be required to carry an A-1 Visa to enter Cuba. For individuals holding passports from one of the following countries; Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Cameroon, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Ghana, Guinea, India, Iraq, Iran, Kenya, Nepal, Nigeria, Pakistan, Philippines, Sierra Leone, Somalia, Sri Lanka, Syria, Yemen. Please contact us direct at info@cubavisaservices.com for further information.

Please note that visas received on weekends or holidays will not be processed until the next business day.

 

OFAC Licensing

There are two authorized licensed travel categories according to OFAC, General and Specific. Depending on the reason for the visit the traveler may need to seek a specific license from the U.S. government, or OFAC, before they travel to Cuba. Travelers whose trips fall under certain travel categories do not need to get approval before traveling. Usually, after signing an affidavit proving they fall under one of the 12 categories for travel from the U.S. to Cuba travelers are allowed to visit Cuba with a general license.

12 Categories

  • Family visits

  • Official business of the U.S. government, foreign governments, and certain intergovernmental organizations

  • Journalistic activity

  • Professional research and professional meetings

  • Educational activities

  • Religious activities

  • Public performances, clinics, workshops, athletic and other competitions, and exhibitions

  • Support for the Cuban people

  • Humanitarian projects

  • Activities of private foundations or research or educational institutes

  • Exportation, importation, or transmission of information or information materials

  • Certain export transactions that may be considered for authorization under existing regulations and guidelines.